Saturday, February 14, 2015

RU Women's History Month 2015: Weaving the Stories of Women's Lives

March 2, 2:00, Heth 16. Circle of Life Intergenerational Dialogue (50+ in inner circle), Dr. Sarah Hastings (Director, Doctor of Psychology Program)


March 2, 5:00, McGuffey Auditorium. Award-Winning Novelist Dorothy Allison, author of Bastard out of Carolina, Cavedweller, and other works


March 4, Noon, Bonnie Auditorium. Welcome by President Kyle.
Dr. Mary Atwell: “Our Wretched Sisters: Gender and Executed Women”


March 16, 2:00, Heth 16. Circle of Life Intergenerational Dialogue (30s- 40s in inner circle), Dr. Sarah Hastings


March 18, 4:00, Heth 45. Dr. Virginia Weisz and Debra Massaro (Nursing): “A Day in the Life of a Belizean Mother”


March 19, 2:00, Heth 22. Dr. Roann Barris and Students from ARTH 420 (ARTH): “Contemporary Art History and Women’s Issues”


March 20, 4:00, Heth 16. Dr. Deneen Evans (School of Social Work), Natalie Fajardo (Assistant Director for Diversity and Inclusion), Dr. Diane Hodge (Director School of Social Work), Crasha Townsend (Director Center for Diversity and inclusion): “LEAN IN—Women, Work, and the Will to Lead: What Happens when Women of Diverse Voices Lean In?”


March 23, 2:00, Heth 16. Circle of Life Intergenerational Dialogue (20s and under in inner circle), Dr. Sarah Hastings


March 25, 5:00, Brewin’ Around Coffee Shop. Slam Poetry Event. Loren Phillips ( English)


March 26, 11:00, Heth 16. STEP-UP! Bystander Intervention: Julie Dill (SAVES), Dr. Amy Sorensen (Sociology)


March 26, 3:00, Heth 16. STEP-UP! Bystander Intervention: SAVES Staff, Dr. Amy Sorensen (Sociology)


March 26, 7:30, Albig Theatre. Paradigm Shift: An Evening of Women’s Work— a concert celebrating Women’s History Month, featuring original creative dance works by emerging female choreographers from the RU Department of Dance



March 27, 1:30, Bonnie 249. Dr. Donna Boyd (Co-Director Forensic Science Institute) and Dr. Sara O’Brien (Biology): Women in STEM Professions—Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies for Success (panel discussion with STEM students and professionals)



March 29, 2:00 & March 30 & March 31, 7:00, Bonnie Auditorium. Performance of Eve Ensler’ s The Vagina Monologues. Directed by Lucinda McDermott


March 30, 10am-5pm, Muse Banquet Hall. Caitlyn Parker (History, English, and Women’s Studies): "Defining and Creating Safe Spaces: A Day of Workshops, Lectures, and Discussions”



March 30, 2:00, Heth 16. Bence Bays, Leanne Hancock, Cassandra Perkins (Career Center ): “Women and the Work World”



March 30, 1-5 & March 31st, 10-4, Heth 14. Dr. Carlee Bradbury and Students from ARTH 414 (Art): “The Mary Project”—Art Exhibit and Symposium
March 30, 1:00, Heth 14. Exhibit Opening & Students’ Presentations
March 31, 10–4, Heth 14. “The Mary Project” Exhibit


March 31, 4:00, Bonnie Auditorium. Dr. Hilary Lips (Chair, Department of Psychology): “Women Working for Less: What’s the problem?”


April 1, 4:00, Covington Foyer. Closing Reception. President Penelope Kyle: “Reflections on Women and Women’s History Month." The entire University community is cordially invited to join us for refreshments, live music, and conviviality.



Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Spring 2015 Women's Studies Classes

The following classes count toward the minor in Women's Studies at Radford University

History of Women (A) - 20045 - HIST 306 - 01
11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Cook Hall 311


Human Sexuality - 20597 - HLTH 453 - 01
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Peters Hall
Human Sexuality - 20598 - HLTH 453 - 02
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Peters Hall




Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 21584 - HUMD 300 - 01
9:30 am - 10:45 am TR TBA
Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 21585 - HUMD 300 - 02
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR TBA
Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 21586 - HUMD 300 - 03
5:00 pm - 8:00 pm M TBA
Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 21587 - HUMD 300 - 04
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm W TBA
Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 21588 - HUMD 300 - 05
5:00 pm - 8:00 pm M TBA


Lifespan Developmental Psychology - 21216 - PSYC 230 - 01
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR TBA
Lifespan Developmental Psychology - 21217 - PSYC 230 - 02
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF TBA
Lifespan Developmental Psychology - 21218 - PSYC 230 - 03
9:00 am - 9:50 am MWF TBA
Lifespan Developmental Psychology - 21219 - PSYC 230 - 04
10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF TBA


Social Psychology (SS Core) - 21236 - PSYC 343 - 01
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR TBA
Social Psychology (SS Core) - 21237 - PSYC 343 - 02
8:00 am - 9:15 am TR TBA
Social Psychology (SS Core) - 21239 - PSYC 343 - 03
9:30 am - 10:45 am TR TBA


Social Inequality - 21143 - SOCY 250 - 01
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF TBA
Social Inequality - 21145 - SOCY 250 - 02
3:00 pm - 3:50 pm MWF Online


Men and Women in Society - 21146 - SOCY 326 - 01
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR TBA
Men and Women in Society - 21147 - SOCY 326 - 02
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm TR TBA


Race and Ethnic Relations - 21148 - SOCY 331 - 01
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm T TBA
Race and Ethnic Relations - 21149 - SOCY 331 - 02
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF TBA


Scholar-Citizen: Introduction to Women's Studies - 20002 - WMST 101 - 01
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF TBA

Women in the World: Introduction to Women's Studies - 20005 - WMST 101 - 04
9:30 am - 10:45 am TR TBA
Women in the World: Introduction to Women's Studies - 20006 - WMST 101 - 05
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR TBA


Senior Portfolio - 20007 - WMST 400 - 01
4:00 pm - 4:50 pm M TBA

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week Food and Clothing Drive for the WRC


In honor of National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week, the Women's Studies Club will be collecting donations of Coffee, Canned foods (Ravioli and such), birthday cake supplies (mix, frosting, candles, etc.) and Plus-Sized sweat suits for the Women's Resource Center of the New River Valley. 



Donation boxes will be in the Bonnie and the English Department (Russell Hall) from Monday, November 17-Friday, November 21. If you plan to participate, the National Coalition for the Homeless would like you to participate in their Social Media "Thunder Clap."




If you would like to make a monetary donation, please contact the administration office at: (540) 639-9592, administration@wrcnrv.org , or P.O. Box 477, Radford, VA 24143 . Checks can be made payable to the Women’s Resource Center.



You may also make a monetary donation online via PayPal at: www.wrcnrv.org/howYouCanHelp/do_.shtml


ABOUT THE WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF THE NEW RIVER VALLEY


Located in Radford, Va., the WRC of the NRV is a human service agency with the purpose of providing programs and services to adult and child victims of domestic and sexual violence. The WRC has been providing hope and help to those who need it in the New River Valley for 30 years. The center, the oldest in Virginia, has been and will continue to be, the cornerstone of courage and inspiration for thousands of people in our community.

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Hey, Baby…give me a smile….


In the past few days, this video (also posted below) went viral on Facebook.

It is created by Rob Bliss of Rob Bliss Creative in conjunction with Hollaback! A non-profit group working to end street harassment which is currently in 79 cities and 26 countries. 

Most women have been harassed as they walk down the street at some point in their lives. It may be negative or mocking, but often it is catcalls, honking and unwanted complements. Unwanted compliments are difficult. It can be hard to complain about a guy saying you have nice hair or some other part of your body that is not sexual. If it is sexual, it is easier to identify. 

Where is the line between paying someone a compliment and harassment? How many women walk down the street and tell passing guys that they like their eyes or their toned arms? The closest we usually get to that is to tell them we like their shirt. Usually this is to identify with them in some way, recognizing a fellow fan, alumnus, etc. As women, we accept some types of compliments regularly about our appearance. Those types are great and we love it when people, usually people we know, pay them freely. But, of course, the difference is that they are not objectifying us in any way. 

Since it is something that often happens when we are alone, for each of us it is a singular experience. We can tell people about it but, it is hard to articulate how it makes us feel. It is entirely possible you tell someone and they say, “He said you have nice hair? The jerk!...So, what’s your problem?” Many of us don’t bother telling anyone because, what good would complaining do and, if you don’t explain it right, it might sound like bragging.

I thought this video was great. It does a couple of things. It tells me that I am not alone in my experience, that there are more than just a few guys out there that think this is ok and, gives me something to show men to see what happens when a woman walks down the street in jeans and a crewneck shirt.

I think the perspective is interesting and the sound is great but, you don’t get the proximity. There is a point where a guy is trying to give her his number and there are several people around her and there is some distance between her and the camera. There are a couple of times the fact that the guys are up close to her plays into it. 

The one that walks beside her for several minutes is disturbing but, I personally think he would have gone away if she had looked at him. If that didn’t work, one gigantic step to the right and a change of pace would have changed the dynamic and he would have gone away or pursued. At that point, the people around would be overtly aware that his attention was unwanted. However, her escape route is not the point; the point is that she shouldn’t have to deal with this while simply walking down the street.

Since writing this, other news/social media outlets have picked it up.
Just a few:

  •  There are many other articles and blog posts by now and plenty of people like Michael Che that will miss the point. Which Salon weighed in on. 




Saturday, October 25, 2014

Women's Studies Club Endorses Susan B. Anthony for Congress!



Candidate Morgan Griffith 
(R-district 9) 
on the issues:

-Voted NO on reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act (2013)
-Strongly opposes women’s right to choose (1999, 2006, 2007, 2010)
-Supported a constitutional amendment to prohibit same-sex marriage (2009)
-Voted against a bill prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation for government employees in Virginia (2010)
-Voted against a bill that would extend anti-discrimination laws to include transgender people (2010)



Griffith is running against William Carr (I), who has not publicly stated his views on these issues, but identifies as a Conservative. If you do not agree with either candidate, do not waste your right to vote! 

We are encouraging a write-in 
vote for Susan B. Anthony.





Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Wintermester 2014 and Spring 2015 Women's Studies Classes


The following classes count toward the minor in Women's Studies at Radford University

Wintermester 2014-2015:
Lifespan Developmental Psychology - 40032 - PSYC 230 - 01
Online



Spring 2015:
History of Women (A) - 20045 - HIST 306 - 01
11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Cook Hall 311


Human Sexuality - 20597 - HLTH 453 - 01
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Peters Hall
Human Sexuality - 20598 - HLTH 453 - 02
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Peters Hall


Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 21584 - HUMD 300 - 01
9:30 am - 10:45 am TR TBA
Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 21585 - HUMD 300 - 02
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR TBA
Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 21586 - HUMD 300 - 03
5:00 pm - 8:00 pm M TBA
Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 21587 - HUMD 300 - 04
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm W TBA
Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 21588 - HUMD 300 - 05
5:00 pm - 8:00 pm M TBA


Lifespan Developmental Psychology - 21216 - PSYC 230 - 01
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR TBA
Lifespan Developmental Psychology - 21217 - PSYC 230 - 02
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF TBA
Lifespan Developmental Psychology - 21218 - PSYC 230 - 03
9:00 am - 9:50 am MWF TBA
Lifespan Developmental Psychology - 21219 - PSYC 230 - 04
10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF TBA


Social Psychology (SS Core) - 21236 - PSYC 343 - 01
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR TBA
Social Psychology (SS Core) - 21237 - PSYC 343 - 02
8:00 am - 9:15 am TR TBA
Social Psychology (SS Core) - 21239 - PSYC 343 - 03
9:30 am - 10:45 am TR TBA


Social Inequality - 21143 - SOCY 250 - 01
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF TBA
Social Inequality - 21145 - SOCY 250 - 02
3:00 pm - 3:50 pm MWF Online


Men and Women in Society - 21146 - SOCY 326 - 01
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR TBA
Men and Women in Society - 21147 - SOCY 326 - 02
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm TR TBA


Race and Ethnic Relations - 21148 - SOCY 331 - 01
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm T TBA
Race and Ethnic Relations - 21149 - SOCY 331 - 02
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF TBA


Scholar-Citizen: Introduction to Women's Studies - 20002 - WMST 101 - 01
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF TBA
Women in the World: Introduction to Women's Studies - 20005 - WMST 101 - 04
9:30 am - 10:45 am TR TBA
Women in the World: Introduction to Women's Studies - 20006 - WMST 101 - 05
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR TBA


Senior Portfolio - 20007 - WMST 400 - 01
4:00 pm - 4:50 pm M TBA

Saturday, May 3, 2014

Guest Post: Black Sheep

In my family, Granny-Bird and I are the black sheep, different from the rest. While my family and extended family are all conservative Christians, my grandmother and I are the liberals with no religion. When my other grandmother lectured me about reading books that weren’t Christian enough for her liking, Granny-Bird encouraged me to read and grow as I please. She never tried to restrict who I am. Sure, she’s a bit of a clean freak, which conflicts with my messy personality, but we’ve always been able to work through our differences. As I’ve grown older, Granny-Bird and I have grown closer, especially after she moved down here, only an hour away from my family. When I came out to my parents, they weren’t too accepting of me. Granny-Bird, on the other hand, never even batted an eyelash. I told her I was gay and had a girlfriend and she just said, “Okay, do you like her?” She could care less who I’m dating, as long as I’m happy. When my parents freaked out about me volunteering with Planned Parenthood at the Pride festival in Roanoke, Granny-Bird gave me a high five and told me, “Right on!” Granny-Bird has helped me learn that I don’t need my parents' approval to dictate what’s right or wrong, that I can determine this on my own and that’s okay. This new found confidence she has given me has helped me become more comfortable in who I am and what I can do with my life.

I came into this interview unsure of what I might learn, because already, in just the past few months, I’ve started learning so much about her life. Now that I’m an adult, everything my mother never wanted me to know can be out in the open. Since they only live an hour away, I go over there and do dinner with them when I’m home on breaks, without the rest of my family. Having this one on one time with Granny-Bird has given me the opportunity to learn more about her life. Granny-Bird, whose real name is Elizabeth Lint, was born in 1943 to conservative, Christian parents in Durum, North Carolina. She has a husband, Tom, a daughter from her first marriage, Erika, a son-in-law, Rob, and 4 grandchildren, Caitlyn, David, Steven, and Jacob.

Growing up, Granny-Bird explained, “Girls were expected to be little frilly, quiet, appeasing, nonentities. Better seen with a smile on your face, and helping everybody out than being someone who had an opinion.” The plain way she explained all of this told me how this idea was ingrained in her at such a young age. She was forced to go to teas and other social obligations, because young girls and women were expected to attend events like that. She explained that, “People were looking at you and saying ‘oh how nice dear’ and you know good and well they’d stab you in the back in a heartbeat. That’s what it was like. We were the little nothings.” Women were still viewed as useless, pretty things until later in Granny-Bird’s life. Even in recent a lot of women are still viewed as objects.

One of the most profound and saddening stories she told me was when she applied for George Washington University to become a doctor. I could see the anger and sadness in her face as she told me “I received a rejection letter, even though all of my credentials were superb. I sent a letter back asking what deficits do I have and how I can make it so I would be eligible. They wrote back and said ‘You’re a woman and you’re too old’; I was in my thirties at the time. This story was something she had actually told me earlier that day and I had told her would be something I’d love to use in the interview, because that moment really showed her how limited the world was and what caused her to always fight for more for herself and her children and grandchildren. Not only was her age in an issue, but the fact that she was a woman who wanted to be a doctor was also called into question. When she said, “I think today’s society has become much better for women, but it’s been an uphill battle all the way. I would not wish that early experience on any woman today.” She looked sad when she told me this, because those early experiences really took a toll on her and her peers. I asked her later if these gender norms had affected her first marriage, but she just gave me a look that told me that talk was for another day.

When I started asking her about historical events, she first mentioned being involved in demonstrations against the Vietnam War and how she has “always been proactive in protesting injustice”. I started to ask her if she had any experiences that involved women’s rights and she jumped right into describing how she “became more of a women’s lib person back when women had difficulties getting birth control and how they were treated as if they were whores [if they used birth control]” This is when she started working in a women’s health center in Northern Virginia. I never knew that Granny-Bird had ever worked in a center, because part of the center was an abortion clinic. My mom disagrees with abortion, so she kept that part of my grandmothers past hidden from me. I’m the only one of my siblings that knows. I loved hearing about this, because I learned that Granny-Bird is passionate about women’s rights of all kind and doing whatever it takes to try to give women the rights they deserve.

Speaking of my mother, Granny-Bird and my mother have always had a bit of a rough relationship. When I asked my grandmother about how she raised my mother, she said she raised my mother to be “independent” and to “advocate for herself”. My grandmother has always wanted my mom to become a professional woman and not just a stay at home mom. Although my mother is a stay at home mom, my grandmother spoke very fondly of it when she told me, “However she is a professional, because she has homeschooled. So I guess in a way I would say I am very proud of her and she has done well in what I consider a very difficult role.” I’ve never heard Granny-Bird say she was proud of my mom for how she chose to live her life and I don’t think my mom has ever heard those words as well. The fact that my grandmother can now say she is proud of her shows that women have gone from staying at home, to working out of the house, and now they have the option of either with less stigma than either has had in the past.

When I asked my grandmother what she thought about women today, she paused for a bit before declaring, “I think that today’s women have a lot more ability to advocate for themselves. They have made a lot of progress in becoming full citizens and I’m very proud of that, that they have done that. Similarly though, there is still a lot of societal pressures to make them more docile and malleable to the needs of men” She realizes that when she was growing up, women weren’t really full citizens. Although there is still progress to be made today, she loves to see how far women have come. When I asked her what she wanted to see in the future, she clearly stated, “I would rather see women equal”

Her closing statement is something that I can never forget. When she said these words, she looked at me, grabbed my hand and spoke these words not just for the interview, but so that I could hear these words and understand how they impacted my life. “Dream your dreams and don’t be afraid to try to have them, live them, be them. And don’t let the naysayers keep you back. You are who you are and be true to that.” These words resonated with me, especially after recently coming out to her. I think she knew that, because I started getting misty-eyed at that point in the interview, which is why I decided to end the interview there.

Granny-Bird is one of the strongest, wisest, and greatest people I know. She survived abusive parents, her lesbian sister’s drug related death, and is now the sole survivor of her immediate family. She is proud of that and I’m proud of her too. She overcame gender roles that were forced upon her by pushing them back and asking why. She knew what she wanted and went after it, no matter the odds against her. I can’t imagine my life without Granny-Bird by my side, encouraging me to always follow my heart, no matter what anyone else thinks or says about it. I want to be like her, a professional woman, fighting for the rights of women. I hope someday someone looks up to me and is inspired by me, the way Granny-Bird inspires me every day.

- Caitlyn Busser