Thursday, April 7, 2016

WMST Fall 2016 Course Offerings

The following courses, being offered in the Fall 2016 Semester, will count towards the minor in Women's Studies.

CRJU 365 Diversity in the Criminal Justice System
11:00 am - 12:15 pm      TR        CHBS Building 5021    Bakhitah Brenda Abdul-Ra'uf   
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm        TR        CHBS Building 5021     Bakhitah Brenda Abdul-Ra'uf   
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm          W         TBA                                TBA


ENGL 453 The Female Literary Tradition
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm        TR        Young Hall 311                       Erin L Webster Garrett   

HLTH 325 Diversity of Health in the US,
11:00 am - 12:15 pm      TR        Peters Hall C142                    Pamela Y. Frasier   

HUMD 300 Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence
5:00 pm - 8:00 pm          M         Peters Hall C117                   Patricia B Shoemaker
11:00 am - 12:15 pm      TR        Peters Hall C174                  Wendy L Eckenrod-Green   
9:30 am - 10:45 am        TR        Peters Hall C174                  Wendy L Eckenrod-Green   
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm          W         Peters Hall C173                  Wendy L Eckenrod-Green   
5:00 pm - 8:00 pm          W         Peters Hall C173              

NURS 366: Nursing in the Childbearing Family
8:00 am - 10:50 am        T          TBA                                      Sharla C Cooper   
8:00 am - 10:50 am        T          TBA                                      Sharla C Cooper   
8:00 am - 10:50 am        T          TBA                                      Sharla C Cooper   
8:00 am - 10:50 am        T          TBA                                      Sharla C Cooper   
8:00 am - 10:50 am        T          TBA                                     Sharla C Cooper   

NUTR 316, Nutrition in the Life cycle I: Maternal and Child
11:00 am - 12:15 pm      MW      Peters Hall C137                  Jyotsna Sharman

NUTR 405, Community and Cultural Nutrition
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm        TR        Peters Hall C143                  Jyotsna Sharman

POSC 390 Gender & Politics
11:00 am - 11:50 am      MWF    CHBS Building 5011            Theresa Schroeder   

PSYC 218, Adolescent Psychology
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm          T          McGuffey Hall 206                TBA

PSYC 230, Lifespan Developmental Psychology
Note: This    is restricted to Athletic Training, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Exercise, Sport and Health Education (Sports Medicine concentration only), Pre-Nursing, Psychology, and Recreation, Parks, and Tourism majors only until April 18, 2016.
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm          MWF    CHBS Building 3012           David A Townsend   
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm          R          Young Hall 402                   TBA
8:00 am - 9:15 am          TR        Young Hall 402                   Jenessa C Steele   
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm          T          Young Hall 402                    TBA

PSYC 250, Psychology of Diversity
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm        TR        Young Hall 302                   Amy J Kelly

PSYC 343, Social Psychology
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm        TR        Russell Hall 007                   Benjamin Biermeier-Hanson   
8:00 am - 8:50 am          MWF    Young Hall 402                     Amy J Kelly   
9:00 am - 9:50 am          MWF    Young Hall 402                     Amy J Kelly   
12:00 pm - 12:50 pm      MWF    Young Hall 402                      Amy J Kelly   

PSYC 391, Psychology of Women
 8:00 am - 9:15 am         TR        Davis Hall 043                      Sarah L Hastings   

PSYC 393, Psychology of Human Sexuality
8:00 am - 9:15 am          TR        Young Hall 302                    TBA

SOCY 250, Social Inequality
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm          MWF    Porterfield Hall 172               TBA
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm          MWF    Young Hall 305                     TBA

SOCY 331, Race and Ethnic Relations
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm          MWF    CHBS Building 3020              Steven M McGlamery

SOWK 300, Human Behavior in the Social Environment I
1:00 pm - 3:50 pm          W         Waldron College Hall 200       TBA
 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm         W         Waldron College Hall 233        TBA
 6:00 pm - 8:50 pm         M         TBA                                           TBA

WMST 101, Women in the World: Introduction to Women’s Studies
12:00 pm - 12:50 pm      MWF    Young Hall 311                  Michele D Ren
9:30 am - 10:45 am        TR        Cook Hall 317                   Dana S Cochran   
11:00 am - 12:15 pm      TR        Young Hall 412                 Dana S Cochran   
 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm       TR        Cook Hall 112                   Sarah L Hastings   
 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm         T          Young Hall 428                  Moira P Baker

WMST 400 Senior Portfolio

12:00 pm - 12:50 pm      M         Young Hall 418                 Moira P Baker   

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Women’s History Month Events---March 2016




Feb. 27, 2:00, Bonnie Auditorium, Aiden James Kozciesza (Transgender Writer and Activist), “Plastic Boy: Transgender Identity Unpacked.” Bridge event with LGBTQ+ Month

Feb 29, 4:00, Muse Banquet Hall, “Diversity in Comics” (Jeremy Whitley). Bridge event with Black History Month

March 1, 7:00, Bondurant Auditorium, “Reimaging Consent: How Healthy Masculinity Can Prevent Rape,” Men Can Stop Rape Organization (Washington, DC)

March 2, 9:00, Heth 22, Dr. I-Ping Fu and CCST 103 students (Foreign Languages): “Holding Up More than Half the Sky: Stories of Chinese Women”

March 14, 4:00, McGuffey 203, Dr. April Herndon (Associate Professor of English, Winona State University): “Women and Children First: Fat Blame in the ‘War on Obesity’”

March 15, 2:00-2:50, Heth 22, Professors Robyn Berg and Jennifer Juul with Grace Ellinghaus and Miranda Roberts (Theatre); Professors Moira Baker and Amanda Kellogg (English) and Students from ENGL 472, THEA 425, and THEA 297: “No Holds Bard: Shakespeare’s Dynamite Women”

March 16, 2:00, Heth 16, Circle of Life Intergenerational Dialogue (50s+ in inner circle), Dr. Sarah Hastings (Director of PSY D Program)

March 16, 6:00, Hurlburt Dining Area Stage, Poetry Slam, Loren Phillips (Design) and Anna Vandevender (Psy D Program)

March 16, 7:30, Albig Studio Theatre, Paradigm Shift: Emerging Radford University Women Choreographers (Dance Department)

March 17, 3:30, Heth 22, Shannon Knuston, Anna Nicholas, Adrianne Reeder (Core 201): “Superwomen: The Evolving Representation of Women in Super(s)hero Comics”

March 21, 3:00, Heth 22, Ariel Hylton and Justine Jackson (English): “Trans-forming Justice: Transgender Issues in the U. S.”

March 22, 12:30, Heth 22, Dr. Amy Rubens (English): “Performing the Mother Instinct: S. Josephine Baker's Radical Vision of Public Health Nursing”

March 23, 2:00, Heth 16, Circle of Life Intergenerational Dialogue (30s and 40s in inner circle), Dr. Sarah Hastings (Director of PSY D Program)

March 23, 5:30, McGuffey 206, Drs. Jennifer Jones Powell, Patricia A. Talbot and Ann Mary Roberts (School of Teacher Education & Leadership), “Exploring the Warm Heart of Africa: Ten Years of Engaging Heads, Hands, and Hearts with RU’s Malawi Study Abroad Program”

March 24, 5:30, Heth 14, Dr. Thelathia “Nikki” Young (Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, Bucknell University), “Imagining New Relationships through Ethics, Queerness, and Intersectionality”

March 25, Noon, Library Conference Room, Dr. Thelathia “Nikki” Young, Discussion and Workshop: “Socially Engaged Pedagogies, Being an Activist-Scholar, and Student Activism.” All faculty and students are invited to participate. BRING YOUR IDEAS.

March 28, 4:00, Heth 22, Michelle Muttart (Certified Therapeutic Yoga Instructor): Yoga Workshop—”Balancing the Chakras and Your Life”

March 29, 2:00, Heth 22, Dr. Theresa Schroeder, “Fortifying the Glass Ceiling: National Security Threats as a Barrier for Female Political Candidates"

March 30, 2:00, Heth 16, Circle of Life Intergenerational Dialogue (20s & teens in inner circle), Dr. Sarah Hastings (Director of PSY D Program)

March 30, 4:00, Covington Foyer, Closing Reception, President Penelope W. Kyle, “Reflections on Women and Women’s History Month” The entire University community is cordially invited to join us for refreshments, live music, and conviviality.


March 30, 7:00, Bondurant Auditorium, “Speaking of Sex …”. Dramatized reflective scenarios concerning sex, relationships, communications, & consent


On-Going Annual Events

Her-Story Celebration:   For each day during the month of March, subscribers to the Her-Story Project Listserv will receive an essay character sketch, photo journal, or poem submitted by one of the members of the listserv, reflecting on specific women or aspects of womanhood.  Our celebration is unique in that each day’s tribute is composed by an RU student, staff member, administrator or faculty member.

Circle of Life / Intergenerational Dialogue:  On Wednesdays during March, an inner circle of women from one generation will speak to an outer circle of participants from other generations about their life experiences and what it is like to be a woman in a particular age group.  Participation is open to all members of the RU community.

Paradigm Shift:  Each year this concert celebrates Women’s History Month by featuring original creative dance works by emerging female choreographers from the RU Department of Dance.


The Women’s Studies Program and Advisory Committee extend a  special thanks for their support to:  President Penelope Kyle, Dean Katherine Hawkins, Vice-President for Student Affairs Mark Shanley, Associate Vice-President for Student Affairs & Dean of Students Irvin Clark, Assistant Director of Student Activities for Greek Life Robert Marias, National Panhellenic Council, Interfraternity Council, Office of Residential Life, Professor Erin Webster-Garrett and the Scholar-Citizen Initiative, Ms. Crasha Townsend and the Center for Diversity and Inclusion, Club Programming Committee, Dean of McConnell Library Steve Helm, Women’s Studies Club, Sociology Club, Ms. Sally Cox (without whom we’d be lost), and all the participants who gave so generously of their time and talents.

Monday, February 15, 2016

Guest Post: "The 'Bitch' and the 'Ditz'” by Sarah Dennis and Nicole Giessuebel

As we find ourselves in another presidential race that, until this week, had one woman in each party seeking the nomination, WMST 101 students comment on the 2008 article by Amanda Fortini: The “Bitch” and the “Ditz” How the Year of the Woman reinforced the two most pernicious sexist stereotypes and actually set women back.

*******************


I have noticed the bitch and the ditz stereotypes for a long time. In movies, books, and of course in real life. And it’s always one or the other. There are certain personality traits that make up each category. If a woman is smart, she’s a bitch. If a woman is particular about who she dates, she’s a bitch. If a woman voices her discontent with anything, she’s a bitch. And on the other side; if a woman is too nice, she’s a ditz. If a woman likes to date and/or hookup with a lot of guys, she’s a ditz. If a woman is the kind to keep quiet even when she’s unhappy, she’s a ditz. It really amazes me to see how strong and lasting those two stereotypes are. And of course it would flow over into politics. I wonder if the real problem isn’t actually that men think women are too incompetent to govern, but that they are intimidated that women will be much better at it than they are, and the fragile foundation of their patriarchal lives will crumble. Nothing else could possible make sense to me. Women represent half of our population. Women are doctors, police officers, soldiers, architects, scientists, and everything in between. Why then are women still seen as inferior? Why is there still such a colossal problem that men find with women being politicians? Anything that has ever been considered a man’s domain; a sport, a profession, a hobby, is now being done by women. By lots of women. And they’re doing it at the same rate and skill level as any man. It baffles me that we have come so far as human beings and yet cannot seem to move past this particular issue of gender inequality.

So maybe Hilary and Sarah wouldn't have made great presidents. That doesn't mean that every single woman wouldn't.

- Sarah Dennis



*******************


This article looks at the double bind women in power find themselves. They are either the bitch or the ditz. The article focuses mainly on the 2008 presidential campaign, where these two archetypes were thrust upon Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin. Clinton was beaten down by reporters and other politicians, claiming that she was hostile, and it made them fear their manhood. One man even said when she talked he instinctively crossed his legs. Why is a woman in power so threatening to their masculinity? If Clinton was a man, saying and doing these same things, she would have been admired. When women step out of their “traditional” role of homemaker and dare to try to break the glass ceiling, they are seen as out of their minds. They are mean and tough, things a woman is not allowed to be.

On the other hand, when women are seen as mothers, caregivers, or wives, like Palin, it is silly that they would want to be in a position of power. Palin has children, so people said she should be back home taking care of them not trying to take care of a country. Of course male candidates with children are not seen as having that same responsibility. It is never questioned why a man is working when he could be back home taking care of the kids.

Sarah Palin did many things that I feel set women back in politics. After it was clear she was unprepared, and most likely unqualified for the position of vice president, she tried to flirt her way into votes. This demeaning of herself made it even easier for others to call her a ditz. It also made it easier for people to call future political candidates such things. There is a line from the article that I really enjoyed, it said that no women in politics was better than a woman that was going to take women leaps back.


- Nicole Giessuebel




Saturday, November 14, 2015

Guest Post: White Privilege by April Johnson and April Knutsen

Though Professor Peggy McIntosh wrote her seminal article "White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack" in 1989, the piece still resonates with students today. Here Women's Studies 101 students work to "unpack the invisible knapsack."


                                                             *******************


McIntosh stated in the beginning that just how we acknowledge male privilege and its advantages because of a woman’s disadvantage, the same is applied to race. As an African American, I can point something out about someone else’s race and the beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries of that race but it’s more effective when someone of that own race realizes just how privileged individuals just so happen to be.

If I decide to start a conversation about white people then I am just saying the same thing that a lot of other races have said or are saying but when someone who is white and understands their privilege addresses the accuracy of the situation a light bulb goes off in the minds of other privileged white persons.

The list McIntosh made is accurate and it can go on to be much longer than that. White privilege has allowed security for those who belong in the category. White privilege is not even realizing that you have acquired these benefits in your life because no one has had to tell you differently. Cultures that are failed to be recognized have to take their own stand and initiatives to getting their voice to be heard. No one’s blaming anyone because you were born with these privileges but it’s important that you realize you have them and others may not.

Being white makes a statement that may be unbeknownst to its people that says, “Society gives me power, and with that power I have an advantage over others because of the color of my skin”. It’s amazing how such a small difference in individuals can determine the life you’ll lead. Being white means that if you and a black person are both in a store, both wearing a white t-shirt and jeans, it’s more likely that a black person will be closely watched more so than the white person even though they are both equally capable of acts of deviance or even acts of normality.

White privilege is being able to see products for your hair and skin and not think twice that it doesn’t apply to others. I don’t get to see commercials for women of color and products that will work best for me. White privilege has always been there. It will always be there. White privilege allows for your acquired safety in this society.

- April Johnson



*******************

This article was very different but also very enjoyable to read. The author hits ... so many points that I have never thought about before, and ironically a point that was made was about how people don’t give the issue of “white privilege” enough consideration. I found it very important that throughout the article white privilege did not mean racism, although it didn’t mean anything very positive. The article is stating that a white privilege and unfair advantages exist in the world and people are actively doing nothing to reduce the issue.

While reading the list of conditions the author made I found myself in shock about how many that I saw familiarity in. Regarding number 5, I think this is a pretty significant issue because in the past few years I personally haven’t seen much positive coverage of any non-Caucasian people in the new, or media. I think it is a learned societal norm to accredit whites automatically even if something of equal or greater is happening elsewhere with one of a different race.

Number 20* was another point that stood out to me and I share a personal experience with it. White privilege applies to the lack of production of non- Caucasian toys or dolls, or posters with non-Caucasian people on them. When I was a child, about 8 or 9, my mom bought me the African-American “American Girl-Doll,” Addie. My friends all thought I was weird for having it and made fun of me for her, but I loved my doll. At that young age was the first time I was introduced to a racial discrimination. Another quick point that stuck out to me was number 26, about the Band-Aids and the flesh tone. I have never seen a darker colored Band-Aid and when this article brought it to my attention I was honestly kind of angry.

At the end of the article, specifically the last paragraph, made a very to the point conclusion. She in my words, she basically said: are we going to take what we’ve learned from this and use it in a positive way or just sit back and ignore that it happened. I think that that last couple sentences apply to many other popular issues including women’s rights.


- April Knutsen


*"I can easily buy posters, postcards, picture books, greeting cards, dolls, toys, and children’s magazines featuring people of my race."

RU Students stand outside Martin Hall, Friday, November 13th to show solidarity with students in Missouri at #Radford4Mizzou 

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Spring 2015 courses that count toward the minor in Women's Studies

WMST 101. Women in the World
WMST 400. Senior Portfolio
APST 460. Current Issues in Appalachian Studies (Focus on Appalachian women)
APST 560. Seminar: Current Issues in Appalachian Studies (Focus on Appalachian women)
CRJU 365. Diversity Issues in the Criminal Justice System
HLTH 453. Human Sexuality
HUMD 300. Human Growth and Development, Birth through Adolescence
PSYC 230. Lifespan Developmental Psychology
PSYC 250. Psychology of Diversity. 
PSYC 343. Social Psychology
SOCY 250. Social Inequality
SOCY 326. Men and Women in Society

SOCY 331. Race and Ethnic Relations

Saturday, September 12, 2015

Guest Post: A Day Without Feminism by Taylor May and Danika Padin

In their prologue to Manifesta: young women, feminism, and the future, Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards take readers back to 1970, the year both were born, in order to describe "A Day Without Feminism". Students in WMST 101: Women and the World are often shocked by the lack of freedom for American women as little as 45 years ago.

Here are responses from two of them:

This reading was very interesting to me. I have never imagined what my life could be like now had the women’s movement not happened. Right now I would be at a “girl college” trying to get an education, probably studying to become a teacher or something of that sort. The majority of people around me would be white and because I am a girl, I would have a curfew. If I found a man in college to marry I probably would not pursue a career, I would just become a housewife. If I did decide to pursue teaching, not only would I be making a lot less money than the average man, but I could also get fired simply for being pregnant. Sex was taboo back then and they did not want children knowing that women were involved in it. Although one would think that the children would know or eventually learn that they came out of their mother’s tummies.
            Women were not able to stick up for themselves the way they can now. There was no such thing as sexual harassment, so their bosses could get away with basically treating them however they please. It was hard for a single woman to find an apartment to live in because landlords did not want to rent to them. If a woman were to go into a restaurant without a man with them they would most likely not be served.
            Back then it was about looks, not brains. I am so grateful I was not alive during this time. I did not realize this affected every little aspect of a woman’s life. Women were not taken seriously and were just expected to be happy and pretty at all times. Its as if they were not even treated as real, respectable people. Life without feminism would be 100% different. I am appreciative of all the feminist women who have gone before me. Because of the impact they have made, I can be taken seriously as a hard working and independent woman.  
~Taylor May


Reading through this excerpt is like getting a splash of cold water in the face. There you are minding your own business, when all of a sudden, this author wants you to stop what you’re doing and face the facts. She tells us that if we aren’t counting our blessings, then we haven’t been paying attention. By taking us back to the 1970’s, we are able to see a dramatic difference and, therefore, validate the work feminists have done in our country.
Listing the disappointing mistreatment and oppression of women in that time period, the author gives us a taste of how many struggles women have overcome. A stand-out sentence pointed out the complete lack of classes in prestigious universities that focused on minorities (including women). The author specifically said that the lack of such areas of studies “implies that they are not worth studying.” I felt that one of her main points was that the omission of minority focus was oppression.

Having no female rabbis or cantors during the 70’s was something that caught my attention. I’ve often wondered about how a female perspective could shape a Sunday service. Somehow, I brain went to another dark place from there; women in the media. It’s very apparent that women have had to claw their way to be in modern media the way that they are today. However, one of the things that is most irritating to me is the way that women are still represented in advertisements. Every time I see a commercial for a cleaning product, I practically beg my television screen not to show me a housewife. Is it so much to ask that I see men represented in cleaning commercials? It’s not like women are the only ones who have to buy sponges in North America.

Aside from my rant about cleaning advertisements, there were many other connections that I could make between this excerpt and the real world. I can remember my single mother venturing out into the job market to sell insurance. She was pregnant, but she pretended to just be overweight. Mom told me, “I can’t let the interviewer know that I’m pregnant, they don’t want to give me time off, so I’ve got to be careful.” It felt wrong to me that she was being punished like that. She even felt like she had to wear a fake engagement ring so that when people asked her questions about her pregnancy outside of the office, they wouldn’t judge her. Although, women don’t have to sign a “baby contract” anymore, I think there’s still some red tape there; an unspoken agreement that an employer won’t be “tricked.”

By the end of this piece I felt cynical and angry. I had so many questions to be answered. The image of women in the 70’s was of an incompetent trophy. She couldn’t even be trusted with her own health. Surgeons would know what was best for them, so they just did whatever they wanted to their patients. With the acceptance of women marrying older men, it painted a picture of someone that needed to be protected from their own sexuality, weakness, and incompetence.
~ Danika Padin



Friday, April 3, 2015

Fall 2015 Women's Studies Classes

Diversity in Communication - 10694 - COMS 457
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Whitt Hall 009 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Lisa E Baker


Diversity Issues in the Criminal Justice System - 11011 - CRJU 365
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR TBA Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Bakhitah Brenda Abdul-Ra'uf
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR TBA Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Bakhitah Brenda Abdul-Ra'uf
6:30 pm - 9:30 pm M TBA Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture TBA


The Female Literary Tradition - 11690 - ENGL 453
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF Davis Hall 216 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Michele D Ren


History of Women (B,C) - 10148 - HIST 306
12:00 pm - 12:50 pm MWF Cook Hall 311 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Suzanne E Ament


Diversity of Health in the United States - 10700 - HLTH 325

11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR TBA Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Pamela Y. Frasier


Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence - 11418 - HUMD 300
9:30 am - 10:45 am TR TBA Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Wendy L Eckenrod-Green
5:00 pm - 8:00 pm M Peters Hall C103 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture TBA
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Peters Hall C116 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Wendy L Eckenrod-Green
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm TR TBA Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Wendy L Eckenrod-Green
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm W Peters Hall C137 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Wendy L Eckenrod-Green
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm M Peters Hall C143 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture TBA
5:00 pm - 8:00 pm W Cook Hall 129 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture TBA


Nutrition in the Life Cycle I: Maternal and Child - 10748 - NUTR 316

11:00 am - 12:15 pm MW Peters Hall C136 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Jyotsna Sharman


Lifespan Developmental Psychology - 10355 - PSYC 230
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF Russell Hall 007 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture David A Townsend
3:00 pm - 3:50 pm MWF Russell Hall 007 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture TBA
9:30 am - 10:45 am TR Russell Hall 007 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Jenessa C Steele
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm R Russell Hall 113 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Jason Derek Watson


Psychology of Diversity - 10359 - PSYC 250
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Russell Hall 033 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Amy J Kelly


Social Psychology (SS Core) - 10654 - PSYC 343
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Russell Hall 007 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Hilary M Lips
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm TR Russell Hall 007 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Hilary M Lips
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm TR Russell Hall 007 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Amy J Kelly


Psychology of Women - 10665 - PSYC 391
8:00 am - 9:15 am TR Russell Hall 347 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Hilary M Lips


Psychology of Human Sexuality - 11959 - PSYC 393
8:00 am - 9:15 am TR Davis Hall 043 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture


Social Inequality - 11559 - SOCY 250
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF Young Hall 221 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Elizabeth C W Lyman
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF Young Hall 221 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Elizabeth C W Lyman


Race and Ethnic Relations - 11561 - SOCY 331
11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Young Hall 305 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Carla Corroto
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm TR Waldron College Hall 200 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Steven M McGlamery
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR TBA Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Steven M McGlamery


Sociology of the Family - 11567 - SOCY 389 - 01
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm TR Davis Hall 212 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Lawrence Michael Eppard


Women in the World: Introduction to Women's Studies - 10226 - WMST 101
11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Davis Hall 216 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Michele D Ren


Women in the World: Introduction to Women's Studies - 10227 - WMST 101

9:30 am - 10:45 am TR Cook Hall 317 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Dana S Cochran


Women in the World: Introduction to Women's Studies - 10228 - WMST 101

11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Cook Hall 317 Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Lecture Dana S Cochran


Senior Portfolio - 10229 - WMST 400
12:00 pm - 12:50 pm M TBA Aug 31, 2015 - Dec 17, 2015 Directed Study Moira P Baker